Resources and Information for Schooling your Children at Home

Supporting Gardner School Students During School Closure

All children benefit from routine and with opportunities for choice, and independence. Younger learners will need more guidance and modeling from adults while fifth to eighth-grade students are ready to practice self-management skills toward independence.

Routines can be modeled, practiced and shared with students. As days pass, students can be encouraged to offer help in adjusting the routines and schedules. And remember, there is no wrong way to encourage learning. Do your best, seek out resources when needed, and give yourself and your children time to learn how to learn at home. Most importantly, stay safe and healthy as we work through this time together.

 

Food Service

Meals for students will begin on March 31 and occur each Tuesday and Thursday. Drive up, pick up will be at the Gardner School and between Peakview and the West High School building. The times will be between 11:00-12:00. You will pick up two breakfasts and two lunches on each of those days.

Assignment Pick-Up and Due Dates

Each teacher will communicate how to access or pick up assignments and when they are due. Please make sure students complete assignments and contact teachers when your child is having difficultly with work.

Elementary Student Sample Home Learning Schedule

8 – 9 a.m. Breakfast and morning exercises

9 – 10 a.m. Academic time (see suggestions below)

10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Creative time: art, music, cooking or meal planning, building, and hands-on projects

12 – 1 p.m. Lunch and free time

1 – 1:30 p.m. Writing time

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Project time

2:30 – 3 p.m. Quiet and rest time

Suggested Learning Activities

  • Suggested Kindergarten – 2nd Grade Activities

    Reading

    • Have your student read a “just right” book daily for 15-30 minutes
    • Read aloud to your student and ask comprehension questions such as:
      • What are you picturing as you read/hear this text?
      • What are you wondering about?
      • What has happened so far? / What have you learned so far
      • CkLA

    Writing

    • After reading a book or portion of a book, select one prompt to respond to:
      • Write about what happened in the story.
      • Write about your favorite part and tell why you selected that part.
      • Write about what might happen next in the story.
      • Write a story.

    Mathematics

    This is a great time to share with your students that math is everywhere. K-2 students should spend 10 minutes/day for math games and/or workbook practice.

    • Count Everything: Counting is a powerful activity that students can do anywhere.
    • Count in different ways, by 2’s, 5’s, 10’s. Start counting from different numbers, not just at zero. Celebrate landmark numbers – Clap or jump when you get to multiples of 10 like 10, 20, 30, etc.
    • Play store! Count while you stock shelves or exchange and count pretend money.
    • Talk about Shapes: Find, classify and sort shapes in your home. How many circles can you find, how many rectangles – and how many of those are squares.
    • Measure everything. Use nonstandard tools like a shoe or even your hand to measure how tall a table is or how far you can jump.
    • Point out fractions – share things – like a can of soup – between people. Each person gets a 1/2 or 1/3. Note how this new kind of number is less than one but more than none!
    • Read Stories! Mathematize reading time. Most children’s books are ripe with opportunities to notice shapes, count objects, compare two things, notice how things change and grow, and to make predictions about what is going to happen based on the information we already have!
    • Look at coins and determine how old they are using the date. Sort them from oldest to the newest coin. If you have a large collection of coins arrange them into a bar graph based on year or the location, they were minted. What is the most common date or location?

    Science

    • Go outside and make observations. Look for evidence of animal habitats (i.e.: spider webs, bird nests, animal tracks, or leaves with insect bite marks, etc.)
    • Look for evidence of spring in the plants (i.e.: flowers, buds, new leaves, etc.)
    • Collect rocks or leaves from outside and let students think of creative ways to put the objects into groups. (i.e.: size, color, shape, texture) Ask students to explain why they chose the grouping they chose.

    Suggested 3rd – 5th Grade Activities

    Reading

    • Have your student read a “just right” book daily for 15-30 minutes
    • Read aloud to your student and ask comprehension questions such as:
      • What are you picturing as you read/hear this text?
      • What are you wondering about?
      • What has happened so far? / What have you learned so far?
      • CKLA for K-5 students

    Writing

    • After reading a book or portion of a book, select one prompt to respond to:
      • Write about what happened in the story.
      • Write about your favorite part and tell why you selected that part.
      • Write about what might happen next in the story.
      • Write a story.

    Mathematics

    This is a great time to share that with your students that math is everywhere. Grade 3-5 students should spend 10 minutes/day for math games and/or workbook practice.

    • Measure, count, and record. Count how many jumping jacks or pushups can be done and how long it takes – or how long it takes to do 10 or 20. Play around with doubling or halving the time. Use non-standard tools, like a shoe, to count how far someone can jump – calculate how far 10, 15, or 20 jumps might take you.
    • Build something together. Big or small, any project that involves measuring includes counting, adding, and multiplying. It doesn’t matter whether you’re making a clubhouse out of shoeboxes or building a genuine treehouse.
    • Involve your students in shopping. Talk about prices as you shop and estimate the cost by rounding to friendly numbers or use a calculator for more accuracy.
    • Look at coins and determine how old they are using the date. Sort them from oldest to the newest coin. Find the sum of their ages. Find the difference between the oldest and the newest. If you have a large collection of coins arrange them into a bar graph based on year or location where they were minted. What is the most or least common year or location?
    • Count things and generalize to larger sets. Count how many beans are in one cup and estimate how many are in a larger bag. Count how many students are in their class and estimate how many students are home from their school or from the school district.
    • Mathematize reading time. Most children’s books are ripe with opportunities to notice shapes, count objects, compare two things, notice how things change and grow, and to make predictions about what is going to happen based on the information we already have!

    Science

    • Keep a “Spring Changes” journal by making daily observations of the weather, plants, and animal changes that occur as the spring approaches. Draw pictures and write about what evidence you see of the coming spring season. Record the questions you have.
    • Using household items, design and build the tallest free-standing structure you can build.

    Physical Education for All Students

    Children and adolescents ages 6 through 17 years should do 60 minutes or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily. It is important to provide young people opportunities and encouragement to participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age, that is enjoyable, and that offer variety.

    Aerobic: Most of the 60 minutes or more per day should be either moderate- or vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity on at least three (3) days a week. Some aerobic activities include brisk walking, running, climbing stairs, jumping jacks, playing basketball, and dancing.

    Muscle-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least three (3) days a week. Some muscle-strengthening includes squats, leg lifts, and sit-ups.

    Bone-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include bone-strengthening physical activity on at least three (3) days a week. Some bone-strengthening activities include push-ups, push-ups against a wall, and jumping.

    A single session of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity can reduce blood pressure, improve insulin sensitivity, improve sleep, reduce anxiety symptoms, and improve some aspects of cognition on the day that it is performed. Most of these improvements become even larger with the regular performance of a moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Other benefits, such as disease risk reduction and improved physical function, accrue within days to weeks after consistently being more physically active

    Resources for Physical Activity Boosts:


    External Online Learning Resources

    Families are doing a great job of finding engaging and high-quality online learning resources and have shared many of them with us. We have narrowed the list down to resources that are free and developmentally appropriate. Below you will find websites organized by topic area and to browse at your leisure.

    These external website resources are not directly aligned with our curriculum or supplemental learning but have been suggested by the teaching community as fun and appropriate online resources for students.

    Here is a comprehensive list of resources! http://www.amazingeducationalresources.com/

    Science and Nature Websites

    San Diego Zoo Animal facts, stories, activities, and games for students.

    Yellowstone National Park Information about the park, geology, wildlife, history, hydrothermal, and preservation.

    Kids National Geographic

    CK-12 Foundations Science, math, social studies, photography, and more lessons for K-12 students.

    Mystery Science Science lessons for K-5.

    EveryDay Earth Teaching Earth Science how students naturally learn.

    Elemental Science Blog Science activities to elementary students to complete at home.

    The Concord Consortium Free STEM activities for students of all ages.

    NASA Kids Club Play games and learn about NASA.

    Climate Kids NASA’s online learning about the climate for kids.

    Cells Alive! Learn about cells through interactive games and activities.

    Visual and Performing Art

    National Gallery of Art An introduction to art and art history for elementary students.

    Chrome Music Lab Fun, hands-on experiments for learning music.

    Metropolitan Museum of Art for Kids Art history created for, with, and by kids.

    The Louvre Virtual tours of art galleries and exhibits for students.

    Kiwi Co At home crafts and projects for students of all ages.

    Kids Think Design A kids design collaborative projects.

    Math

    Fun Brain Math and Reading activities for K-8 students.

    MathScore Math practice and assessments for all grade levels.

    ABCYa Math and reading activities for K-6 students.

    Math Playground Math games for students in 1-6 grades.

    Kodable Learning to code for K-5 students.

    Freddy’s Fractions Practice fractions through a fun game.

    Reading, English Language Arts, Spelling, Writing

    Fun Brain Math and Reading activities for K-8 students.

    Starfall Online literacy games and activities for PreK-3 students.

    Storyline Online Popular children’s books read by celebrities.

    ABCYa Math and reading activities for K-6 students.

    Classroom Cereal Grammar practice in free, printable short stories.

    No Red Ink Writing and grammar lessons and activities for all students.

    Novel Effect Read aloud app and lessons for young students.

    Paragraph Punch Students learn how to write paragraphs through online learning exercises.

    Spelling Training Spelling exercises for elementary students.

    History and Social Studies

    Bunk History Digital history archives

    CK-12 Foundations Science, math, social studies, photography, and more lessons for K-12 students.

    Country Reports Lessons about countries and cultures around the world.

    Mission US An interactive way to learn US history for elementary students.

    Smithsonian Lessons from the museum and the zoo for kids.

    Ben’s Guide to the US Government Follow Benjamin Franklin as he teaches students 4-14+ years old about the formation of the US government.

    Web and Coding

    Free Code Camp Resources to learn how to code online.

    Code Academy Learn how to code for free.

Student Online Resources

Access to online books and resources.Encyclopedias/General Reference

Encyclopedias/General Reference

For younger students, if they are using the internet, encourage them to use Kiddle rather than Google. Kiddle is a search engine supported by Google and prevents the appearance of things that are not suitable for them. 

 

Health

  • Medline Plus Medline Plus is the National Institute of Health’s website produced by the National Library of Medicine. Brings you information about diseases, conditions, and wellness issues.
  • Proquest Health This database includes journals and magazines covering an enormous range of health subjects, from sports injuries to women’s health, from food and nutrition to midwifery, from eye care to dentistry

Language Arts

  • KidsReads.com Book reviews and information about great books for kids and teens
  • Novelist Makes it quick and easy to find the books you will love
  • Novelist K-8 Makes it quick and easy to find the books you will love, tailored for students in grades k-8.
  • TeachingBooks A website that adds a multimedia dimension to the reading experiences of children’s and young adult books.

Math

Social Studies

  • Ancestry – Access to Ancestry Classroom
  • ABC CLIO American Government, American History, Daily Life Through History, Pop Culture Universe
  • Culture Grams CultureGrams (video) helps researchers discover the world with concise cultural and statistical snapshots of every country recognized by the United Nations — from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe
  • HistoryLink.org Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History
  • Proquest History Study Center A collection of primary and secondary sources on global history from ancient times to the present day

Videos

Gardner School teachers 3-8 are at the beginning stages of  using Google Classroom and some have begun:

  • Posting assignments
  • Administering quizzes, entry tasks, and exit tickets
  • Extending student discussions
  • Hosting documents
  • Communicating important calendar events and due dates

Families have access to use the PowerSchool for 5-8 graders to view assignments past due, incomplete or graded. Please check to make sure your students are keeping up with school work. Thank you, Principal Pam


 

 

Census Information:

Date Dear Parent/Guardian of Gardner School Students:

I am writing to share very important information about an event that will take place in spring 2020: the U.S. Census.

The census is a count of all people living in the United States and takes place every 10 years. It is simple and confidential to complete. For the first time, you can respond online. You will receive a unique identifying number in the mail, which will allow you to fill out the online form beginning in March 2020. It will ask questions about your household such as how many people reside in your home, date of birth, race, and sex. Here are some things you should know:

Your identity remains anonymous. Any personal information you provide on the census form is protected by law and cannot be shared with anyone or any other federal agency. Regardless of your immigration status, the information cannot be used against you or to invade the privacy of you or any members of your family.

The census is important. The census is important because it helps to decide how much federal money our schools will get over the next 10 years, and how much money our state will get for our parks, neighborhood improvements, public health, transportation, and many other programs and services. For the [insert name] School District, this means federal funding for  school nutrition programs and supports for students with special needs, who come from poverty, who are learning English, for disadvantaged students to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards and have a well-rounded education. Since the last census, the [insert name] School District has meant $XXX in additional funds to enable these vital services for students. [FIND OUT HERE: https://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/docs/communications/2011-2018%20Title_IDEA_Nutrition%20Distributions%20FINAL%20-%2008.01.2019.pdf]

The census is safe. All data collected through the census is protected under Title 13 of the U.S. Code. Records are confidential for 72 years by law. All U.S. Census Bureau employees swear a lifetime oath to protect respondent information. The U.S. Census will never share a respondent’s personal information with other government agencies. Data is only released in summary tables; no individual records are released. The penalty for wrongful disclosure is up to five years imprisonment and/or a fine of $250,000.

What do you need to do? Complete the short and easy form online. If you don’t have a computer at home, you can use one at a library or at the Gardner School.

Your kids count, so make sure to count them when you fill out the census form in spring 2020!

Sincerely,

Pam Levie

Principal

CARNIVAL TIME

 

Join the fun on March 6 for the annual Gardner School Carnival, the biggest fund-raiser of the year! Burrito Dinner, Bingo, Cake Walk, Booths, Silent Auction, and companionship. Dinner will begin at 5:00. Bingo and booths will run from 5:30 to-7:30. Silent Auction winners will be announced at 7:30. Please come out to support the school!